Friday, May 10, 2019

Vintage Sewing Patterns

Time sure does get away from me, but then that is probably my fault.  I keep going from one interest to another and then back again - reading, music and records from the past, sewing and vintage fashion, researching vintage items, family history, family pictures and letters, all sorts of collections - it just goes on and on and on.  

I have always enjoyed sewing since I was a little girl.  I would get into sewing kicks off and on throughout my adult years.  I would sew a lot for a year or two and then not touch a sewing machine for years.  In the late 1980s and early 1990s, I was in one of my sewing sprees and began buying lots and lots of patterns, material and notions - just couldn't pass up a sale.  Of course, my sewing slacked off way before I used all the patterns, materials and notions.

Last week I started going through some of my sewing patterns and I also pulled a couple of boxes of my grandmother's old patterns, some of which I remember her using to make clothes for me back in the 1950s.  Some of her older patterns are in bad shape and I need to look at those to see if they can be salvaged in any way.  

I opened this Companion Butterick pattern from the early 1940s - #2197.  There were no markings like seam allowances, notches, grain, or darts on the pattern pieces - no indication of what piece it was.  There were just different sizes of round holes in different areas.  At first I thought all the markings had faded off and the pieces were useless.  Then after reading the instructions, realized that was how they were marked back then.



Just think of the skill it would take to sew like this.  




While all the pieces were cut, they were all there and after really examining the pieces, I could see the perforated numbers on each piece.  There was only 1 piece that was torn in 2 pieces, but could easily be fixed. 

























Here are pictures of the different pieces included in this pattern and the pattern perforations instructions.   Also a picture of the sleeve piece showing that it is #11.  It will be interesting to look at these old patterns.   

I will be putting most of my vintage sewing patterns up for sale on my eCrater store @ CAROLINABLUELADY Vintage Collectibles  

I also discovered a wonderful site called Vintage Sewing Patterns.  It is a site where vintage sewing patterns (over 25 years old) can be documented and if available for purchase, it will show you the vendor(s) that you can click on to go and purchase.  Not only can you search by various means like garment type, decade, pattern company, etc, but there are also videos and copies of pattern books to view.  

If you are interested in vintage patterns, I hope you will visit this wonderful site.    

Wednesday, November 1, 2017

A Story of a Needle, Thread and Thimble

I was researching sewing thimbles in regards to collecting them.  There are so many beautiful and ornate thimbles and such wonderful history and stories that goes with them.
 


But the one story I found that I thought I would share was the story called Dependence and Indpendence. a story of "Needle . Thread and Thimble"  Little Folks.  I found this story in 2 different newspaper publications, Morning Oregonian (Portland, OR) dated August 24, 1888 and The McIvor Times and Rodney Advertiser (Heathcote, Vic. : 1863 - 1918) dated January 4, 1889, an Australian newspaper
A thimble, a needle and a piece of thread were all lying on a lady's work table together.  Now, the needle, had rather a nasty temper, and could give sharp pricks when it pleased, and this morning it was out of sorts, so it tried to pick a quarrel with the thimble, and said, spitefully:  "You gave me some hard knocks yesterday, and I wish you would be more gentle in the future." 
"It is true, I do push you hard sometimes," answered the thimble, "but you know it is only when you do not do your work properly, and our mistress makes me keep you up to it." 
 "Pray, don't you two quarrel," said the thread wishing to be a peacemaker. 
"You mind your own business," retorted the needle.
"My business is your business," said the thread, "for you are no use without me, and I am none without you."
"That's just it," said the thimble.  "A great deal of nonsense is talked in this world about being independent, but my own opinion is that people should try to help one another, for, from the highest to the lowest, we are all very dependent n the good services of our neighbors for something or other every day of our live."  
Check out "Sewing Thimbles and A Gift of Love" on The Vintage Village  Blog and our new Pinterest board for thimbles.
   

Sunday, September 3, 2017

Fragrances of Avon and Billy Dee Williams

I was just listing some vintage Avon jewelry in one of my online stores and had to pull my vintage 1985 and 1986 Avon brochures to check for accurate descriptions of the items.  I have always been fascinated with the Avon company - the marketing is fabulous.  The brochures usually came out every two or three weeks and there were always a few new items or specialty items that drew your attention whether it was jewelry, fragrances, gift items or seasonal decor items.  Needless to say, I have had to go through the brochures many times in researching all of the Avon products that my mother had purchased.

I don't know how many fragrances Avon has come up with over the years. Since fragrances were the  beginning of Avon back in 1886 (they were originally known as the California Perfume Company), I'm sure there are probably over 200 fragrances including discontinued or name changes.

My first Avon cologne that I purchased as an adult was Moonwind first introduced back in 1971.  Not only did I love the fragrance but I also thought the packaging was really pretty - the dark blue containers with silver trimming. Avon always came up with a 'personality' slogan for their fragrances as part of their marketing.

Moonwind - evokes the mystery of night; richly romantic; haunting; bewitching

Imari - a fragrance to fire the imagination

Timeless - enduringly beautiful fragrance for today and for all your tomorrows





Sweet Honesty - a young, light-hearted fragrance

Candid - sheer, light, long-lasting, understated being beautiful is being yourself





















And, how could we ever forget the good-looking man,
Billy Dee Williams 



Undeniable

the fragrance for women inspired by Billy Dee Williams

Some Avon vintage colognes available at:

Pictures are from my Avon brochures

Saturday, July 15, 2017

Anchor Hocking Vintage Candle Glow Ovenware

Fire-King by Anchor Hocking was introduced in 1941 with the heat proof Sapphire Blue line and later oven and microwave proof ovenware.  Do not use any in a microwave unless embossed on the bottom.  Fire-King ovenware was produced until 2000.

There are quite a few lines in anchorwhite using decals - Forget-Me-Not, Meadow Green, Primrose, Wheat, Blue Heaven, Chanticleer or Country Kitchen and Candleglow (sometimes shown as Candle Glow).  Not all patterns have all of the same pieces though.  One good thing is that most lids are interchangeable.
Vintage Advertisement
Do not clean these baking dishes in a dishwasher.  The decals will fade and wear.  I never wash vintage dinnerware, glassware or ovenware in a dishwasher period.  Always wash by hand.

I have quite a few pieces of the Candle Glow for sale on eBay.  I like this pattern with the blue and gold candles with flame decals along the side of the dish.  This pattern also includes a coffee mug, cereal bowl and custard bowl that you could use as a dessert or berry bowl.


I do have some of the baking ovenware pieces.  Here's a slideshow of Candle Glow available.


You can purchase these items at:  CAROLINABLUELADY on eBay or you may find a few pieces at my .


#AnchorHocking #FireKing #anchorwhite #CandleGlow #ovenware #bakeware #vintage #carolinabluelady


Thursday, July 13, 2017

Hot Summer Day Cool Remedy Vintage Style

It is going to be a hot one here in Charlotte, NC today - mid-nineties and high humidity.  Cool off with an ice cream dessert using vintage Anchor Hocking Banana Split Dishes
Photograph by Con Poulos
 
Sweet and Salty Ice Cream
recipe courtesy of Food Network Kitchen

Directions:
Soften 1 pint vanilla,, ginger or cinnamon ice cream at room temperature, about 15 minutes. Transfer to a large bowl; use a spoon to mash in 1/2 cup chopped chocolate-covered pretzels. Cover and freeze until firm.


To serve, use vintage Anchor Hocking banana split dishes. Place 3 scoops of the Sweet and Salty Ice Cream in the dishes. Peel and cut a banana lengthwise and lay on side of the ice cream scoops. Sprinkle with crushed chocolate-covered pretzels.  Then lightly drizzle with chocolate syrup.

Anchor Hocking Banana Split Dishes

You can purchase the dishes at 
CAROLINABLUELADY Vintage Collectibles

#AnchorHocking #IceCream #BananaSplit #Dessert #vintage

Monday, July 10, 2017

Cool Sweet Raspberry Sherbet - Pretty In Pink

Photograph by Con Poulos
Could anything be prettier than bright pink raspberries in a vintage Anchor Hocking tulip-shaped sundae dish?  I think not!  Here is a Raspberry Buttermilk Sherbet recipe from the Food Network Kitchen.  I bet it tastes as good as it looks.  



Raspberry Buttermilk Sherbet
Recipe courtesy of Food Network Kitchen

Ingredients
6 cups raspberries (4 to 5 pints)
1/4 cup 100% grape or apple juice
1 cup superfine sugar
1 1/2 cups buttermilk
1/4 cup heavy cream
Salt and freshly cracked pepper

Directions

Puree the raspberries, juice and sugar in a food processor until smooth. Pour through a mesh strainer into a bowl and discard the raspberry seeds. Stir in the buttermilk, cream and a pinch of salt, then cover and refrigerate until cold, about 1 hour.

Transfer the mixture to an ice cream maker and freeze according to the manufacturer's instructions. Transfer to an airtight container and freeze until firm, at least 2 hours. Serve sprinkled with pepper.

Serve in vintage Anchor Hocking Tulip Sundae Dishes.  You can find a set of 4 at CAROLINABLUELADY Vintage Collectibles:  HERE

Only $32.00 for the set and free shipping!

Anchor Hocking Tulip Sundae Dishes
Cool Sweet Raspberries!